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'm thomas roberts. rupert murdoch will testify at parliament tomorrow, this is the big headline, all over the phone hacking scandal that's rocking his media scandal. meanwhile there was a new arrest of a top exec over the weekend, and now the head of scotland yard and his assistant are resigning. if you're keeping score so far, there have been three high-profile resignations, ten arrests and it is not over yet. jim maceda is live in london to bring us up to speed on this. jim, good morning. >> reporter: hi there, thomas. make that four high profile resignations. just a couple of hours ago scotland yard's number two, john yates, also resigned under increasing, extraordinary, really, pressure. that on the heels on his boss's resignation last night. commissioner paul stevenson, he was the head of scotland yard. he, if you will, fell on his sword and said that he could not in good conscience continue with all the challenges to keep the peace in great britain as he and specifically his relationship with the murdock media empire became such a focus of attention. he was calling it a major distra
. the big, brand new nbc "wall street journal" poll, and the revived gang of six which the white house is seizing on to give new life to the president's push for a big deficit reduction deal. the bipartisan group's proposal is still in outline form. they would reduce the deficit by 3.7 trillion over the next decade, cutting discretionary spending, defense spending, overhauling entitlement programs, rewriting the tax code by lowering rates, getting rid of deductions that overall would generate a trillion dollars in those deficit cuts. the plan got an enthusiastic reception from the white house and senate rank and file. watch. >> we now have a bipartisan group of senators who agree with that balanced approach. we have got the american people who agree with that balanced approach. >> 49 senators came to the room, and you know what, there were no fist fights, there were no -- there was no swearing. >> i think they're creating a vital center on what is the most important issue facing the country. >> it is a great start and it has provided great leadership. >>> but senate leaders mitch mccon
is anything more than a big wet kiss to the right wing, and -- and i mean the tea party. that's who i mean. it's too bad his caucus is being run by such a small number of people. >> what will happen between this very moment and a potential vote tomorrow is anyone's guess in the town that is washington, d.c. amid all the bickering and tinkering, the nation is just six days away from a first ever general default, and the treasury reiterating in a statement moments ago there is no guarantee the government can meet all its obligations after an august 2nd deadline, so what are the remaining options for our dysfunctional government? nbc's kristen welker is at the white house and let's also bring in luke russert on capitol hill. kristen, we know both sides are crafting their budget deals, both trying to take the high road, but are there any signs that the differences between the two sides are narrowing, and does it seem as though they may conflate these two plans? >> reporter: well, at this point we don't have any indication that they are going to conflate the two plans. we should say there are, of c
big? what would you get rid of? >> i was one of the folks last week who introduced an amendment that said, let's at least freeze defense spendsing. it's not a very popular thing for a republican to do. i like defense, it's important to me. we only got 65 democrats and only 70 republicans. i'm willing to put everything on the table to be serious about spending reductions. >> what do we do about the big entitlements that go through the roof as people get older and older. you can't limit the number of people turning 65 by law. how do you deal with the cost increase? >> let's start by being honest with ourselves. i think the president did that this week. if you read his veto message about cut, cap and balance, he says the only reasons he opposes a balanced budget amendment is that it prevents us from keeping our promises to the seniors. what he's saying is what we have been telling folks back home, you cannot balance the budget without changing medicare, medicaid and social security. you simply can't do it. the folks back home tell you they want a balanced budget amendment. >> but t
that she could catch fire. look, when you start this thing, when you win iowa, if you win iowa big, that thing starts rolling through new hampshire and south carolina, it's over in weeks. i agree 100%. >> how was she going in philadelphia suburbs? how is she going to do in the i-4 corridor and in wisconsin? how is she going to do in new mexico, arizona? i would suggest, with swing voters not well at all. >> there's no doubt if you nominate michele bachmann, it's an enormous risk. the only conditions, i think, under which i believe she could win the presidency, if people say, if they did in 1980, i don't care, i'm taking a chance with this guy because what we got we can't stand, you get 9% or 10% unemployment, two more years, this country is ready for a lot of change. more "morning joe" in a moment. with the hotels.com 48-hour sale, the possibilities are endless. interesting... save up to 50% this tuesday and wednesday only. hotels.com. be smart. book smart.  finally, there's a choice for my patients with an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, or afib, that's not cause
house back to the table, back to talking about something big. now, look, we still got a long ways to go. it's a weekend of sales jobs going on right now that actually began last night when the president had the congressional democratic leadership over to start talking turkey. so that brings us to the other sticking point, the actual substance. everybody has to figure out what to cut. this isn't going to be as easy as folks think and both sides are moving toward a deal that would include a trigger to assure mutually destructive politically when it comes to the two big items being kicked to committees or joint committees and that's still being figured out, tax and entitlements. one incentive plan would kill bush tax cuts for the rich and key portions of the new health care law if somehow the reforms for the tax code and social security and medicare weren't agreed to and implemented by january 1st, 2013. the question is, is the penalty on the bush tax cuts sort of the idea that you're kicking this down, is that going to be enough to assuage some democrats who believe there's too many cuts
about doing that are very dramatic. i think there's still time to get something big done. the president's made it clear he wants to do something substantial. you know, when you look in the past at agreements between divided government, it's taken leadership on both sides. it took reagan and o'neil, it took clinton and gingrich. the president is out there, he's willing to do it. he said it in the "state of the union," he said it in the budget. the question is do we have a partner to work with? and i hope the answer is yes. >> but you suspect it may not be yes. >> leadership requires a partner. >> mr. lew, thank you very much. appreciate your time. >> thank you. >> joining me is assistant majority leader of the senate, democrat dick durbin of illinois, and republican senator from south carolina, author of "the great american awakening: two years that changed america, washington and me," senator jim demint. welcome both. >> thank you. >> good morning. thank you. >> tim geithner, treasury secretary, was here last sunday. i asked him about this ongoing deliberation, and he was emphatic about
of higher than expected receipts, but they're going to have a couple big social security payments and interest payments due, so it's not entirely clear to the markets or to anybody else when treasury will exhaust its reserves. >> annie lowery, economic and business reporter for slate. >>> well, joining me from the hill now illinois republican congressman robert dold who serves on the financial services committee. representative dold, thanks for being here this morning. it's a busy day. >> thanks for having me. i appreciate it. >> i know, sir, that you supported john boehner's plan, but you say you would have voted for it without a budget balanced amendment. why are some of your colleagues saying they need that fully knowing it would not pass the senate? >> the number of my colleagues booef e plea of we have to change the way washington is working, so we've been grossly overspending for a long period of time. it's been happening on both sides of the aisle. it's a clear washington problem. american families have tightened their belt. american businesses have done the same. they shou
will be raised by next week, but the big question that everybody is asking is how is this going to happen, because it seems that all sides are digging in the heels and the white house continuing to insist that the president would veto a short term plan which is that plan put forth by speaker boehner that is as kelly mentioned would increase the debt ceiling in increments for the first time for six months, and press secretary jay carney, again, today saying that the president would veto that if it made it to his desk, and carney saying that bill would doubtfully pass the senate, but the president said in the remarks last night he does support the plan put forth by reid which would of course, decrease the deficit by $2.7 trillion and raise the deficit through 2012, and here is what press secretary jay carney had to say about the reid plan earlier today. >> it is a legitimate compromise measure. we believe it could pass the senate and the house if folks gave it a fair shake, and we appreciate senator reid putting it forward. the fact that there remains confidence in the world that washington
of answers to that. first of all, the size of the debt, the national debt, has grown. it really is big right now, almost as large as the whole economy itself and it hasn't been that way since the end of world war ii. people have been increasingly attempted to use the debt ceiling vote as a political weapon. the democrats did that a few years ago. as a matter of fact, barack obama, when he was a senator, not president, voted against an increase in the debt ceiling for political reasons himself. but when the tea party arrived, they use this vote as an excuse for a kind of building takeover. i'm of the '60s generation, this feels to me like occupying the administration building, okay? that's who the tea party people are. they want to stop the system with a capital "s." they think they are doing the lord's work, literally, in doing so, and that's the problem john boehner had in dealing with them. he didn't have money to give them, instead of giving them pork, because there are no ear marks, he gave them constitutional pork in the form of this vote on the constitutional amendment to balance the b
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)